OPENING HOURS FOR CLASSES

Mon :

12:00  - 20:00 

Tue :

12:00  - 20:00 

Wed :

12:00  - 21:30 

Thu :

12:00  - 20:00 

Fri :

17:00  - 19:00 

Sat :

10:00  - 12:00 

Closed Sunday

East Anglian Mixed Martial Arts Academy

203a London Rd South
Lowestoft NR33 0DS
Tel: 01502 507221
E-mail: eammaa@gmail.com

Or use our online contact form.

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MIKKUSU BUDO BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU BEGINNERS CLASS

The MIKKUSU BUDO BJJ class is designed to give the beginner a chance to experience the basics of Brazilian Jui-Jitsu. From stand to ground, passing guard, drills and a lot more.....

 

Please use the contact form below to contact us and to reserve your place on this exciting concept of ground fighting and defence.

 

Every Saturday from 10am until 12 noon

Age restriction is 14+

 

BOOK NOW......

FREE SUIT FOR ALL NEW MEMBERS

CLUB JIU-JITSU GI £40 members £65 non-members

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ORIGIN

Mitsuyo Maeda, was one of five of the Kodokan's top groundwork (Ne – Waza) experts that judo's founder Kano Jigoro sent overseas to demonstrate and spread his art to the world. Maeda had trained first in sumo as a teenager, and after the interest generated by stories about the success of Kodokan Judo at contests between Kodokan Judo and jujutsu that were occurring at the time, he changed from sumo to Judo, becoming a student of Jigoro Kano. Maeda left Japan in 1904 and visited a number of countries giving "jiu-do" demonstrations and accepting challenges from wrestlers, boxers, savate fighters and various other martial artists before eventually arriving in Brazil on November 14, 1914.

Gastão Gracie was a business partner of the American Circus in Belém. In 1916, Italian Argentine circus Queirolo Brothers staged shows there and presented Mayeda. In 1917, Carlos Gracie, the eldest son of Gastão Gracie, watched a demonstration by Maeda at the Da Paz Theatre and decided to learn judo. Maeda accepted Carlos as a student and Carlos learned for a few years, eventually passing his knowledge on to his brothers.

At age fourteen, Hélio Gracie, the youngest of the brothers, moved in with his older brothers who lived and taught traditional Japanese jiu-jitsu in a house in Botafogo. Following a doctor's recommendations, Hélio would spend the next few years being limited to watching his brothers teach as he was naturally frail. Over time, Hélio Gracie gradually developed Gracie Jiu Jitsu as a softer, pragmatic adaptation from Judo, as he was unable to perform many Judo moves that require direct opposition to an opponent's strength. Through the years Hélio Gracie developed a system that focused on ground fighting, as opposed to Judo which emphasizes throwing techniques. Years later, Hélio Gracie Challenged Judo's legend Masahiko Kimura. According to Kimura in his book "My Judo", He thought of Hélio Gracie to be a 6th Dan judo at the time of his fight with him in 1951. However, there is no Kodokan record of Hélio Gracie having any Dan grade in judo, but it is not unusual for a foreign judoka's actual grade to be higher than that officially granted and recorded by the Kodokan, as Kodokan ranks are maintained independently and have much more strict requirements.

Although Brazilian jiu-jitsu is largely identified with the Gracie family, there is also another prominent lineage from Maeda via another Brazilian disciple, Luis França. This lineage had been represented particularly by Oswaldo Fadda. Fadda and his students were famous for influential use of footlocks and the lineage still survives through Fadda's links with today's teams such as Nova União and Grappling Fight Team. 

DEVELOPEMENT

Hélio Gracie had competed in several submission-based competitions which mostly ended in him winning. One defeat (in Brazil in 1951) was by visiting Japanese judoka Masahiko Kimura, whose surname the Gracie’s gave to the arm lock used to defeat Hélio. The Gracie family continued to develop the system throughout the 20th century, often fighting full-contact matches (precursors to modern MMA), during which it increased its focus on ground fighting and refined its techniques.

Today, the main differences between the BJJ styles are between traditional Gracie Jiu-Jitsu's emphasis on self-defense, and Sport Brazilian jiu-jitsu's orientation towards competition. There is a large commonality of techniques between the two. Also, there is a wide variety of ideals in training in different schools in terms of the utilization of pure or yielding technique versus skillful application of pressure to overcome an opponent.

GROUND FIGHTING

BJJ is most strongly differentiated by its greater emphasis on groundwork than other martial arts. Commonly, striking-based styles spend almost no time on groundwork. Even other grappling martial arts tend to spend much more time on the standing phase. It is helpful to contrast its rules with judo's greater emphasis on throws, due to both its radically different point-scoring system, and the absence of most of the judo rules that cause the competitors to have to recommence in a standing position. This has led to greater time dedicated to training on the ground, resulting in enhancement and new research of groundwork techniques by BJJ practitioners.

Along with BJJ's great strengths on the ground comes its relative under emphasis of standing techniques, such as striking. To remedy this comparative lack, there is an increasing amount of cross-training between the sports of BJJ and wrestling, Judo, or Sambo, as well as striking based arts such as: boxing, Karate, TaeKwonDo, Muay Thai, and kickboxing.

TRAINING METHODS

Sport Brazilian jiu-jitsu's focus on submissions without the use of strikes while training allows practitioners to practice at full speed and with full power, resembling the effort used in a real competition. Training methods include technique drills in which techniques are practiced against a non-resisting partner; isolation sparring, commonly referred to as positional drilling, where only a certain technique or sets of techniques are used, and full sparring in which each opponent tries to submit their opponent using any legal technique. Physical conditioning is also an important part of training at many clubs.


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